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Action, as in an Unavoidable Illusion

May 10, 2011
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  1. Action depends upon the description of the senses as in an unavoidable illusion, alike.
  2. The one thing is nothing left but happens to exist, as experience is at the moment and inefficient.
  3. Since things may pass for nothing, if all existing things must be in common, such a good many things that thing.
  4. They have no error can have no error in the entire mass of suffering, some say.
  5. Response: It is a great grasping, the act of thought, is so anxious and so must be written into one.

Composed in collaboration with Gnoetry 0.2 and the following source texts:
Nagarjuna, Mulamadhyamakakarika
Ludwig Wittgenstein, Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus
Gertrude Stein (Selections), GERTBOT Base Nature Texts
Nagarjuna, Seventy Stanzas
Sir Thomas More, Utopia
Immanuel Kant (trans. Meiklejohn), The Critique of Pure Reason

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3 Comments leave one →
  1. May 13, 2011 3:06 am

    Killer. I think the best way to approach these is as humans process them:

    1a. Action depends upon
    1b. the description of the senses
    1c. as in an unavoidable illusion,
    1d. alike.

    Everything’s smooth until the uneasiness to the word “unavoidable”, which foreshadows the last chunk, “alike”, which has no referents. This turns the sentence into linguistic nonsense and thus calls into question its topics of senses and illusion.

    2a. The one thing
    2b. is nothing left
    2c. but happens to exist,
    2d. as experience is
    2e. at the moment
    2f. and inefficient.

    Here the initial uneasiness comes at line 2b, where “left” has no obvious referent; this is magnified by line 2c. Lines 2e and 2f nail it home, turning the abstract concepts meaningless, which is echoed by the last word “inefficient.”

    3a. Since things may pass for nothing,
    3b. if all existing things must be in common,
    3c. such a good many things
    3d. that thing.

    The repetition holds this sentence together. Not so much a lack of reference; rather an overloading of the term “thing”. Like describing the Dao, the words become things that are used to point and then be discarded.

    4a. They have no error
    4b. can have no error
    4c. in the entire mass of suffering,
    4d. some say.

    A bit weaker than the rest. Or maybe I’m just missing something.

    5a. Response:
    5b. It is a great grasping,
    5c. the act of thought,
    5d. is so anxious
    5e. and so must be written
    5f. into one.

    The lack of referents in lines 5a and 5f is what makes this sentence. 5a decontextualizes the entire sentence, 5b-5e makes it looks like you might actually get a grasp on the sentence, but 5f subverts that.

    Well done.

  2. eRoGK7 permalink*
    May 13, 2011 6:10 pm

    I love your analyses of these poems, edde. I make great efforts to work intuitively, and often don’t think as much about what I do as I should.

    I’m not sure if I think of these poems as “difficult” or just opaque. This thing called “same” is like a wall of statements that I want to say only one thing over and over, which is “same.” Which is, I’m beginning to wonder, “nothing” or “nothing left.”

    It’s a work in progress, but I am fond now of the numbers. I will likely shuffle the lines later and number them from 1 to whatever, similar to one of the source texts, Nagarjuna’s Seventy Stanzas. We’ll see.

  3. May 15, 2011 5:55 am

    > I make great efforts to work intuitively, and often
    > don’t think as much about what I do as I should.

    Nah, working intuitively is the right thing to do. Save the critical thinking for after the fact, else you’ll censor yourself. Atma-thought > ego-thought.

    > I want to say only one thing over and over,
    > which is “same.”

    I’ve been reading the Bhagavad-Gita recently, I notice that happens there.

    > Which is, I’m beginning to wonder,
    > “nothing” or “nothing left.”

    Kind of like koans?

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