Skip to content

feel like a death

June 8, 2011

do
I cannot swear to cease
God
I cannot feel like
a death, is no
fucking
calling me
back

that I hear
swear
to think God I have
feel like a
death, is like
fucking calling me back

and I wake
swear to die
God
I hear
feel
like
a death, is the
fucking calling
me
back

 
 

June 8, 2011, Method 155abe85-6ad8-4f99-b429-716d21610a6b (expanding a seed text consistent with a language model.) Seed text from “Suicidal Thoughts” by Biggie Smalls; expansion corpus: Keats “Ode to a Nightingale”; generator: ePoGeeS.

Advertisements
2 Comments leave one →
  1. Eric Elshtain permalink
    June 8, 2011 10:51 pm

    This mixture is a match made in lyric heaven, methinks. That fucking calling the speaker back is a pitch perfect exemplar of the Romantic lyric tension b/t the present moment and the call to eternity, the idea that experience must be severed from time (to feel like a death) to make a presence felt–here a fucking presence.

    This tension is also felt by the speed-of-light aspect of computer generation–a disconnection from usual compositional time–or death of the usual authorial process–versus the human mind at work as it contemplates the process that is essentially superceding its self–or, to put it using the colloquial provided above, the brain gets fucked by the machine in order to feel and to create.

    • June 14, 2011 1:55 am

      to make a presence felt–here a fucking presence.

      killer phrase of all time.

      This tension is also felt by the speed-of-light aspect of computer generation–a disconnection from usual compositional time–or death of the usual authorial process–versus the human mind at work as it contemplates the process that is essentially superceding its self

      I think I get your point. I wrote a bit of fiction recently, and was surprised at how different the process was from the poetry generation I’ve been doing. With poetry generation, it’s like I’m perpetually developing new writing tools that I’m then trying out in writing sessions. So there’s the performative aspect, supported by the contemplative element during which I’m usually thinking about what new tools (programs/methods) to use, and the development element during which I may be programming. With fiction it’s more like an extended period of contemplating what the words I’m writing mean to me: Gardner uses the image of writing and rewriting to explore the parts of yourself you usually don’t consciously think about. Interestingly, I think writing prose is more stressful than writing code! (this is weird because I’ve always done better on writing/literature classes and tests than I did in computer/math classes and tests.)

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: